Long-term neuroprotective effects of hypothermia on neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in rats

Tomimatsu, et al. (2003). Long-term neuroprotective effects of hypothermia on neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in rats, assessed by auditory brainstem response.

• Tomimatsu T, Fukuda H, Endoh M, Mu J, Kanagawa T, Hosono T, Kanzaki T, Doi K, Kubo T and Murata Y (2003). Long-term neuroprotective effects of hypothermia on neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in rats, assessed by auditory brainstem response. Pediatr Res 53:57-61. Summary: A method to assess long-term neurofunctional outcome of hypothermia on immature brains has not yet been clearly established. To investigate the effects of hypothermia on long-term neurofunctional outcome, we studied brainstem function using auditory brainstem response in adult rats after neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. Seven-day-old rats underwent a combination of left common carotid artery ligation and subsequent exposure to 8% O(2) for 1 h (n = 17). The rats were divided into three groups: hypothermia group (n = 6), normothermia group (n = 6), and sham control group (n = 5). During recovery from the hypoxic-ischemic insult, body temperature was reduced to 30 degrees C for 24 h in the hypothermia group, but was kept at 37 degrees C in the normothermia and sham control group. Three months later the rats were assessed by auditory brainstem response, then killed. The normothermia group showed increased III-V latencies and wave V abnormalities. Hypothermia significantly ameliorated wave V abnormalities. Injury to the ipsilateral inferior colliculus was also reduced in the hypothermia group compared with that in the normothermia group, and the degree of damage assessed histologically correlated well with auditory brainstem response findings. The current study demonstrates that postischemic hypothermia may provide effective and long-lasting neurofunctional as well as histopathologic protection to the immature brain. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Faculty of Medicine, 2-2, Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871, Japan. tomimatu@gyne.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

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